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    Earthfest

    $5.00
    By Paul Hanson In 1990, Sheboygan resident, Kathy Alby, started Earthfest to make the public aware of the environment. It was to be a celebration of our environment and a venue to show us what we could do to make positive changes—small or large—to make our world a better place in which to live. Originally held at Lakeview Park, the festival moved to Vollrath Bowl in 1992 and finally to Fountain Park where it thrives today. This book is photographic memory or remembrance by Paul Hanson of some of the people and events that make Earthfest the special summer event that it is.
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    Echoes from Home

    $5.00
    By Jim Carey Echoes from Home is a Civil War novel by Sheboyganite, Jim Carey. This is Jim's first entry into the world of publishing, but he's really been writing for twenty years. The book tells the story of Joshua Miller, survivor of the War of Secession. It is the story of a soldier from the south
  • Annual directory of the inhabitants, institutions, incorporated companies, manufacturing establishments, businesses, business firms, etc. in the City of Sheboygan. Published by Richard Edwards and company.
  • Encore

    $25.00
    By Brian Leahy Doyle In Encore! The Renaissance of Wisconsin Opera Houses chronicles the histories of ten Wisconsin opera houses and theaters, from their construction to their heydays as live performance spaces and through the periods when many of these stages went dark. But what makes these stories so compelling is that all but one of the featured theaters has been restored to its original splendor.
  • By Rochelle Pennington and Nicholas Pennington The authors traveled to the countries of England and Scotland to research the epic adventure of Sir Ernest Shackleton's "Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition," a true account of human strife and triumph. The extraordinary events surrounding one of history's greatest shipwrecks are detailed in their book.
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    By Jim Draeger and Mark Speltz The authors visit 60 Wisconsin gas stations that are still standing today and chronicles the history of these humble yet ubiquitous buildings. The book tells the larger story of the gas station's place in automobile culture and its evolution in tandem with American history, as well as the stories of the individuals influenced by the gas stations in their lives.
  • This collection of stories, images, ads, news articles and factoids  is designed to give you an introductory look at the local history of the 1920s and 1930s in Sheboygan County. It deals with vice- Prohibition, prostitution, gambling, raids on stills and crime over two decades.  It is by no means comprehensive and much of what has been collected is story. This is meant to be fun and informative  --  a great conversation starter.
  • By Richard Zeitlin Between 1820 and 1910 nearly five and a half million German immigrants came to the United States. Most settled in the Midwest and many came to Wisconsin. Learn about the values and the Germans brought with them from the Old Country.
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    By Bill Wangemann

    This second book of Bill’s is a compilation of articles that appeared in the Sheboygan Press during 2004. Many are based on activities of the 1950s

  • By Edgar Harvey Jr.

    This book deals with many of Ed Harvey’s predecessors as Sheboygan County Surveyors. Harvey, after years of research, found that they included men of great character, and others whom we could term “shysters”.  They included some pretty unremarkable individuals and others of great genius.  Although they were humble surveyors while they worked in Sheboygan County, some of these men invented great things, or were otherwise involved in major events which changed the history of the entire nation or the world.  One man worked on the Brooklyn Bridge project.  Another worked on the Panama Canal.  At least two of these men prepared maps which shaped the boundaries of nations.  With all the same care, the same men prepared surveys which depicted the boundaries of comparatively small, private properties in Sheboygan County; An interesting and fresh way of analyzing Sheboygan County History.

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    By Betsy Jones Michael This charming memoir by a Sheboygan author tells about a middle-aged wife, mother/stepmother who, in 1970, trains herself to ride a brand new ten-speed Schwinn Super Sports bicycle. She qualifies for bicycle tours in foreign lands, and finds her own home roads of Wisconsin best of all. Her adventures require physical stamina, discipline and independence and strangely, lead her to uncover mysteries of her mother’s early life, as well as those of her ancestors. She also rediscovers herself. The Green Steed was chosen by Sheboygan’s Mead Public Library for their summer 2009 citywide Sheboygan Reads, co-sponsored by the Sheboygan Press.
  • By the Howards Grove Area Historical Research Committee The settlement of Haven, located in the Town of Mosel on the western shore of Lake Michigan, Sheboygan County, was formerly known as Seven Mile Creek, not Seven Creeks, as has been recorded in a newspaper account of the area’s history. It got its name from a small creek which flowed into Lake Michigan about seven miles north of Sheboygan. The first post office in Haven was established on July 16, 1897. The first postmaster in Haven was Frederick W. Franzmeier. In 1897 Frederick and Herman Franzmeier built a rooming house, tavern and store next to the railroad tracks. In 1903 the post office was established in that building.
  • By Gustave Buchen

    Considered the quintessential book on Sheboygan County history, this volume by Gustave Buchen, was written in 1944, when many of the original settlers were still alive. The information is well documented and tells the story of Sheboygan County's first years. The book includes an index, maps of early Sheboygan County and drawings. 2015 Reprint.

  • By Laura Chase Smith This history of the township of Plymouth, the Villages of Plymouth and Quitquioc, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin was written by Mrs. H.N. Smith. This series of articles was published in the Plymouth Reporter between December 10th, 1872 and June 5th, 1873. It details the lives of Plymouth’s earliest citizens.
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    By Marie Prisland

    This is a reprinting of 23 February 1945 Sheboygan Press article by Ms. Marie Prisland. Marie Prisland was born Marie Cerne in Recica, Slovenia, Austria and came to the United States in 1906 when she was 15 years old. On February 24, 1908 she married John Prisland in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. In 1945 she wrote her history of the Slovenians in Sheboygan which was published in the Sheboygan Press and Wisconsin Magazine of History published by the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. She researched Slovenian history and migration for over forty years.

  • By Elmer Koppelmann The village of Howards Grove began as two separate villages, Howards Grove and Millersville. Not until 1967 did the two unite into one incorporated village. The first European settlers to settle in the town of Herman (originally named Howard) were the "Lippers"- a group of 13 families and seven orphaned young people from Lippe-Detmold, Germany. The year was 1846, and the group's leader was Friedrich Reineking. They settled on the land that is now Lakeland College. This volume brings the history of the area back to life, and documents the families and businesses that, today, make up Howards Grove.
  • By Mary Risseeuw

    These letters, memoirs and travel journals span a hundred year period (1847-1959) and offer a fascinating view into the lives of the immigrants and their families.  Some provide remarkable detail about their journey to America and their struggles to establish a new life.  Others offer little beyond the basics: weather, health, crops, births and deaths. Most are grateful for the blessings of God and the fact that they are still ‘fresh and healthy’ (alive and well, in more modern terms!).  The criterion for selecting the contents of this book was to present an overview of different settlements in Wisconsin and to provide a glimpse into the differences and similarities between the various immigration waves.   There are vivid tales of crossing the Atlantic Ocean and personal glimpses into the Civil War, World War I and World War

  • By Plymouth Historical Society and SCHRC

    Plymouth, originally considered a “hub” city because of the hub and wheel factory located there, it has also earned that moniker because of its central location between Milwaukee and Green Bay. Tourists flock to Plymouth year round to visit the variety of shops, to golf, swim and ski, or explore the beautiful Kettle Moraine State Forest. Residents are proud of their heritage, which can be seen at sites throughout the city. Visit Plymouth through this wonderful tribute using historic photographs.

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    Situated on the picturesque western shore of Lake Michigan, is a city of contrasts and conundrums. It is a modern city facing all the challenges of today’s world, ready and willing to transition into the future. But, at the same time it is a city comfortable with long-established customs struggling to keep the time-honored traditions which have made it a great place to live. It is a place where people stay on the same bowling teams for decades, where churches are always full and focused on the community and where everybody knows everybody else in the local taverns. Chapters included in this book include: Blazing Trails; The First Fifty Years; Saloons and Public Houses; Railroads Bring Prosperity; Riding the Trolley; Eighth Street- The Heart of Sheboygan; and Parades, Festivals and Events.
  • Sheboygan County's iron-fisted work ethic began with its earliest residents. From the jackknife trading posts and mill wrights of the early 1800s to the spas and "Great Wall of China" of Kohler Company, the importance of commerce to Sheboygan County is evident. This wonderful pictorial history of the small family-owned business of Sheboygan County begins in the 1870s and ends with a great image of a 1950s American Classic-McDonald's Golden Arches.
  • Originally platted as the village of Rochester, Sheboygan Falls took shape in the late 1830s and 1840s. Settled by Yankee entrepreneurs from the East, "Sheboygan at the Falls" was a strong settlement from the beginning, surviving even the financial panic of 1837. A city of Greek Revival and Cream City brick architecture, Sheboygan Falls boasts two districts listed on the National Historic Register
  • By David Holmes The Irish have a rich and long history in Wisconsin, dating back to the 19th century. Immigrants quickly formed communities in Beloit, Fond du Lac, and Sturgeon Bay, as well as in rural Trempeauleau County. They worked at day labor, railroad construction, lumbering, fishing, and of course farming. Some of those early Irish communities have disappeared; others have experienced succeeding generations of Irish Americans settling in these Wisconsin cities and small towns and influencing them with their old country charm.
  • Mention the name Prange’s and no matter your age from 40 to 90 you probably have personal memories of the legendary Sheboygan department store. Whether those memories are of the annual animated Christmas window displays and caramel corn, the use of due bills, charge-a-plates, layaways, will-call, the x-ray machine in the shoe department or the escalators, they are shared by many and are part of the cherished collective history of the H.C. Prange Company. This publication is by no means a comprehensive history of the H.C. Prange Company. It is more a trip down memory lane, filled with images, stories and recipes submitted by former employees and loyal shoppers.
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    Jacob’s House

    $18.00
    By Fred Zitzer This book documents the Zitzer family's life in Schulz, Russia (also, known as Lugovaya Gryaznukha, Russia). It also details their immigrant trips to the United States. Modern day images of Schulz by Peter and Judy Kaland.

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