Hours

Monday - Closed

Tuesday  - Friday - 9:00 - 4:00pm

Saturday - 8:30am - 12:00pm

Sunday  - Closed


Lincoln guru, Steve Rogstad, is back this October. The topic for this series is the Lincoln assassination and the plethora of crazy conspiracy theories that surrounded it.  For more info click here!

Sheboygan County Historical Research Center

518 Water Street
Sheboygan Falls, WI 53085


Seth Conover house, Plymouth, WI, circa 1908, is a part of the city's walking tour.  Get brochure here.           Beautiful!

OCTOBER 4th- THE LINCOLN ASSASSINATION

 (920) 467-4667

Driftwood Shanty at Rotary Park

Preserving Sheboygan County

The Sheboygan County Historical Research Center (SCHRC), located in Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin, specializes in the preservation and storage of written records of all of Sheboygan County and the surrounding area.  


Our Services

The Historical Research Center offers a number of services for researchers including: genealogy or history queries, furniture or toy queries, cemetery or gravestone photos, Register of Deeds research, obituary research and foreign language translation.  Contact us to learn more!

Volunteer Focus

Jake Van Norwick is SCHRC's summer intern. He is a versatile volunteer, doing exhibit work, helping with collection management and work with development, outreach and newsletters. He works well with seniors!  Welcome Jacob!!



Closures

Closed Thursday, November  24, 2016 for Thanksgiving.

if history repeats itself, i am so getting a dinosaur!

History Tidbits

Did you know -- Laibach means Little Ljublana. Many Slovenians lived in an area in Sheboygan called Laibach. Our resident Slovenian expert, Mary Meyer did some research a while back and found from her mother, Tillie Strojinc Schetter, that its boundaries were (on the south) Northgate or the road north of Northgate, (on the north) by Eisner Avenue, (on the east) by Lake Michigan and (on the west) by LS.

Slovenian neighborhood names remembered were Zager, Hatata, Smolic, Pragles, Strojinc. for more one could check city directories.

Slovenians thought this area had a resemblance to Ljublana or so many Slovenians lived there (mostly bachelors) that it was called little Ljublana.