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  • By John Textor This is the story of the November 1847 sinking of the propeller ship, Phoenix, from a new perspective. Most of the fatalities were of new Dutch immigrants and this book tells of how life might have been different had the catastrophe not happened.
  • This collection of stories, images, ads, news articles and factoids  is designed to give you an introductory look at the local history of the 1920s and 1930s in Sheboygan County. It deals with vice- Prohibition, prostitution, gambling, raids on stills and crime over two decades.  It is by no means comprehensive and much of what has been collected is story. This is meant to be fun and informative  --  a great conversation starter.
  • Mention the name Prange’s and no matter your age from 40 to 90 you probably have personal memories of the legendary Sheboygan department store. Whether those memories are of the annual animated Christmas window displays and caramel corn, the use of due bills, charge-a-plates, layaways, will-call, the x-ray machine in the shoe department or the escalators, they are shared by many and are part of the cherished collective history of the H.C. Prange Company. This publication is by no means a comprehensive history of the H.C. Prange Company. It is more a trip down memory lane, filled with images, stories and recipes submitted by former employees and loyal shoppers.
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    By Arthur G. Kroos, Jr This is the story of one Sheboygan County soldier, Arthur G. Kroos, Jr., from his enlistment in Company F, 127th Regiment, 32nd Division in the fall of 1940, until release in 1945. Mr. Kroos was chosen to serve a stint as Aide-de-Camp to General Matthew Ridgway. He was trained as a paratrooper seeing service in Northern Ireland, North Africa, Sicily, Italy and on D-Day in France. His final military foray took place in a glider as part of Operation Market-Garden. He was shot down over the Dutch island of Schouwen and spent eight months as a POW at Luft Stalag 1 in Barth, Germany. This book contains his own diary from Luft Stalag 1 and entries from a scrapbook created by his wife, Patty. This is not your average WWII story. It is local history at its best.
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    Down by Prange’s

    $15.00 $10.00
    By Bill Wangemann Mr. Wangemann began writing a weekly column for The Sheboygan Press in January of 2003 to help celebrate Sheboygan’s Sesquicentennial. Contained within this book are all 52 of the columns Bill wrote for the Press. Down By Prange’s brings readers a simpler slice of life. Wangemann paints a realistic picture of Sheboygan’s past, the good and the bad, and you are guaranteed to learn something about old Sheboygan by paging through this collection of columns.
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    Sheboygan County has a rich and varied Native America past.  When the first Europeans arrived, there were probably only about a thousand Indians permanently residing in Sheboygan County, perhaps another thousand during the fishing season on Lake Michigan.

    These Indians had relinquished their title to the land by various treaties made with the United States, from 1831 to 1833, but remained here for a number of years until they gradually moved to other locales, as their former hunting and fishing territories disappeared.

    What is known of the Indians of Sheboygan County comes mostly from the perspective of white settlers. The Native Americans neither kept nor left any written records; they had no written language forms. What is known of their manner of life, their history and traditions, has come down to us in their myths and legends, through archeological remains, and in the accounts of explorers, missionaries, traders and early settlers. The records of even their white observers are scattered and scanty. They are mainly recitals of their own activities, their references to the Indians usually being only incidental. Much valuable information concerning the life and characteristics of the Indians has been obliterated, although some remains.

    This book will share a sampling of the written information gleaned from the archives of the Sheboygan County Historical Research Center.

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    Though we have nothing as dramatic as Pompeii, Mesa Verde or Petra, we, too, have lost settlements. Our lost settlements like Hoard, New Paris, Bear Lake, Gooseville and Hull’s Crossing are lost places of Sheboygan County- communities that were, for a short time, vibrant and busy, but fell into decline and disappeared except for the occasional mention on an old Sheboygan County map.
    We’ll take a trip back to reconnect with many of our local mysteries.
    Available about December 6, 2018.
  • Rebuilding a Railroad in the 21st Century: Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, documents the rebuilding of an 11-mile rail line in Sheboygan County, after being dormant for nearly 30 years.  This was more than just a fix-it-up job, but the replacement of the entire line from the ground up with new track built to modern standards to handle heavy loads.  It also required one trestle to be completely replaced and others reinforced.  Adding to the generous amount of photos, there are “before” and “after” photos taken at dozens of locations, and it won’t seem possible that these photos were taken at the same location. Also included is the history of this line from the pre-civil war era to current times.  Old rail dating back over 150 years was found and included is the story that these old rails tell.
  • By Richard Zeitlin Between 1820 and 1910 nearly five and a half million German immigrants came to the United States. Most settled in the Midwest and many came to Wisconsin. Learn about the values and the Germans brought with them from the Old Country.
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    This is a reprint and update of the 1976 book done for the Bicentennial. This book was done in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of Falls becoming a city. Trace the evolution of the business district and learn about the wide variety of civic groups which once kept citizens busy. See how the fire department has grown and take a peek at the folks who settled Falls
  • “Cedar Grove, Wisconsin, 150 Years of Dutch-American Tradition,” has been updated and reprinted. Three new chapters entitled, “Historical Update, Old News and The Royal Visit” have been added. The new publication will be available for sale at a discounted price during the festival at the following locations: Holland Festival Souvenir Stand, Het Museum, Te Ronde House Museum, Oma’s on Main Restaurant, Cedar Grove Library and the Union Dollar General Store.
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    By Don Lau and Shirley Sager The schools covered in this book include Jefferson, South Cedar Grove, West Oostburg, Beaver Creek, Maple Grove, Fairview, Greene, Amsterdam, River Valley, West Cedar Grove, Liberty, Lakeview and Hoard.
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    By Don Lau This book documents the growth of education in the City of Sheboygan. Did you know that Sheboygan had a Day School for the Deaf, A Fresh Air School- Tuberculosis- as part of the Third Ward School and was the first home of Lakeshore Technical College? Dozens of photos.
  • By Laura Chase Smith This history of the township of Plymouth, the Villages of Plymouth and Quitquioc, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin was written by Mrs. H.N. Smith. This series of articles was published in the Plymouth Reporter between December 10th, 1872 and June 5th, 1873. It details the lives of Plymouth’s earliest citizens.
  • By Denny Moyer

    This short book outlines the 100 year history of Baseball in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Sheboygan's colorful history began with the Elwell Boys sponsored by Elwell Flour Mill and chronicles the many teams up to the present Sheboygan A's.

  • By Elmer Koppelmann The village of Howards Grove began as two separate villages, Howards Grove and Millersville. Not until 1967 did the two unite into one incorporated village. The first European settlers to settle in the town of Herman (originally named Howard) were the "Lippers"- a group of 13 families and seven orphaned young people from Lippe-Detmold, Germany. The year was 1846, and the group's leader was Friedrich Reineking. They settled on the land that is now Lakeland College. This volume brings the history of the area back to life, and documents the families and businesses that, today, make up Howards Grove.
  • The story of the Milwaukee Northern . . . Sheboygan's interurban link to the rest of the world by Peter Fetterer. Available by about November 30, 2018.
  • By Peter Laun

    Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, home to Road America today, was once a summer vacation retreat to thousands of city dwellers from Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Louis. The trains and interurban brought them to enjoy the cool breezes and waters of Elkhart Lake, Crystal Lake and Little Elkhart Lake. This volume discusses Joseph Moore, the founder and many other colorful characters of the village. It reminds us of Villa Gottfried, the Schwartz Hotel, Siebken's, Pine Point, Osthoff and Camp Brosius. Photos accompany each story.

  • By Robert Spatt. The City of Sheboygan has many interesting and important "Firsts". This book documents many of those items. There is bound to be a chapter for every interest and although residents of Sheboygan will know many of these firsts, there are a lot of surprises. Some of the firsts are obscure such as the first bratwurst stand, the first department store, the first female principal of a school, the first baby born in Sheboygan; Others, such as the city founder, Farnsworth, and many of the sporting events, maybe remembered by many. The final chapter is entitled “Et Cetera.” Here are little known firsts that don’t fit into any category – Peter Dinkel and his canaries, Clemens Reiss the first to cross the city’s new Eighth Street Bridge in 1923, the street sprinkler who sprayed water on the dusty dirt streets and other obscure first facts. A book to pick up and read a chapter at a time then casually sprinkle conversations with a “did you know that….”
  • Author Rochelle Pennington has written two books detailing one of the most well-known shipwrecks of the Great Lakes. One for adults and one for children documenting Lake Michigan's Christmas Tree Ship, which delivered holiday evergreens to the citizens of Chicago each Christmas season before it was caught in the "Great Storm of 1912" and subsequently went to the bottom of the lake fully loaded with trees. The captain’s wife, Barbara, along with their three daughters, then carried on for over twenty years afterward in honor of “Captain Santa” and in the spirit of everything he believed in. The ship is still loaded with its cargo today and is a popular Great Lakes dive site. "It is a story which exemplifies the best of humanity," said Pennington. "At its heart we find courage, love, generosity, heroism, and the importance of family. The moment I first heard the story of the Christmas Tree Ship, I understood why it had endeared itself to so many people over the years and was still being shared a century later." "The ship's final voyage was not to the bottom of the lake," added Pennington, "but into the pages of history." This true account of Captain Schuenemann and his schooner is considered the “most loved story of the Great Lakes” over the past century. The story has inspired paintings, poems, six different Christmas Tree Ship songs, television programs, a musical performed all over the country titled “The Christmas Schooner,” and a “new” Christmas Tree Ship sailed by the Great Lakes Coast Guard each holiday season as a living memorial.
  • Sheboygan County's iron-fisted work ethic began with its earliest residents. From the jackknife trading posts and mill wrights of the early 1800s to the spas and "Great Wall of China" of Kohler Company, the importance of commerce to Sheboygan County is evident. This wonderful pictorial history of the small family-owned business of Sheboygan County begins in the 1870s and ends with a great image of a 1950s American Classic-McDonald's Golden Arches.
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    By Scott Knickelbine On the night of October 8, 1871, a whirlwind of fire swept through northeastern Wisconsin, destroying the bustling frontier town of Peshtigo. Trees, buildings, and people burst into flames. Metal melted. Sand turned into glass. People thought the end of the world had come. When the "tornado of fire" was over, 2,500 people were dead, and Peshtigo was nothing but a smoking ruin. It was the deadliest wildfire in U.S. history. Kids’ book.
  • By Oostburg Historical Society Hundreds of photos of the village of Oostburg. Designed as a companion book to Oostburg, Haven of Hope.
  • By the Howards Grove Area Historical Research Committee The settlement of Haven, located in the Town of Mosel on the western shore of Lake Michigan, Sheboygan County, was formerly known as Seven Mile Creek, not Seven Creeks, as has been recorded in a newspaper account of the area’s history. It got its name from a small creek which flowed into Lake Michigan about seven miles north of Sheboygan. The first post office in Haven was established on July 16, 1897. The first postmaster in Haven was Frederick W. Franzmeier. In 1897 Frederick and Herman Franzmeier built a rooming house, tavern and store next to the railroad tracks. In 1903 the post office was established in that building.
  • By Bernard Michaels A story of the settlement of the northern Kettle Moraine in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin focusing on the town of Mitchell.
  • In 1866, Cascade suffered serious setback when a fire wiped out practically the entire main drag including most of its businesses. By 1872, two flour mills, a saw mill, a bank, four grocery stores, a hardware store, three shoe stores, two blacksmiths, a wagon shop, a hotel and two churches had all rebuilt making the “newer’ wider main street. By the 1900 Cascade boosted a healthy business district that included wool carding, two cheese factories, two feed mills, three hotels, a post office, a physician’s office and a dentist office. In 1906 a group of business men held a meeting to discuss the future of Cascade. They came up with a list of things that they thought Cascade needed to continue growing: A fire company. A good library. A good policeman. A few more houses to rent. A number of good sidewalks. A parsonage for the United Brethren Church. Home protection from so many useless peddlers. A few more sheds to keep horses under in wet weather. More people to do less trading with the large firms in Chicago. A few more men to take the ladies out riding.
  • by Peter Fetterer

    The railroads of Sheboygan County have left behind a legacy of stories … some tragic, some humorous, and some almost unbelievable.  The stories bear testimony to the men and women who worked on the early rail lines that served the county … the engineers, firemen, brakemen and conductors who ran the trains … the shop men and track gangs who kept them running … the station agents, freight handlers and railroad officials supporting the operations, and the passengers and hobos who rode the rails.

    The railroaders working these lines for nearly 150 years and the passengers riding their trains have been an integral part of our history. These are some of their stories … tales from the rails of Sheboygan County.

  • By Mary E. Meyer

    This book is a concise history of the port of Sheboygan, complete with photos of the harbor and the ships that plied its waters.  Histories of harbor industries included.

  • The Sheboygan County Connection is a collection of forty-one stories about the way folks from Sheboygan County are connected to the greater world. Most were seen as Sheboygan County History columns in the Sheboygan Press from February to October 2014. Extra information and photos have been added. Topics range from ice fishing and the brutal winter of 1936 to the advent of Rocky Knoll and citizens’ participation in the Manhattan Project.
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