History on the Move programs are open to the public. No reservations necessary.  Conversation is encouraged. Fun is expected! For further details, please contact the library directly. 


Indian Mounds of Sheboygan County
Tuesday, September 12, 2017
Cedar Grove Public Library
131 Van Altena Avenue, Cedar Grove, Wisconsin
6:00pm to 7:30pm


​     Wisconsin, at one point, had more Indian burial mounds than any other region of North America--between 15,000 and 20,000 mounds. About 4,000 remain today. Some were burial sites. Others contained pottery and household items, virtual museums of antiquity.
     Increase Lapham, Wisconsin's citizen scientist, documented Wisconsin's effigy mounds as early as 1855, but surveyed only the Seeley Hill mounds in Sheboygan. He missed the county’s best examples, the Henschel group located north of the Sheboygan Marsh and the Kletzien group in the town of Wilson.
     In this presentation, we'll take a quick look at burial mounds and Native American settlements in the county.


Tales from the Rails
Tuesday, September 26, 2017
1:00pm to 2:30pm
Oostburg Public Library
213 North 8th Street, Oostburg, Wisconsin

     Railroad stories meant to amuse and discuss the way the railroad affected daily life in Sheboygan County. This is not your usual railroad program. 


The Sausage that Made Sheboygan Famous
Tuesday, October 24, 2017
1:00pm to 2:30pm
Oostburg Public Library
213 North 8th Street, Oostburg, Wisconsin

     The bratwurst wasn't always Sheboygan's first sausage; that was summer sausage. But, the brat has come into its own and made Sheboygan famous because of it. We'll visit meat markets, talk about the tradition of great brats and learn a bit about summer sausage.


One Room Schools in the Plymouth area
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
1:00pm to 2:30pm
Generations
1500 Douglas Drive
Plymouth, Wisconsin


History of Farming in Sheboygan County
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
1:00pm to 2:30pm
Oostburg Public Library
213 North 8th Street, Oostburg, Wisconsin


     Agriculture as practiced by the early settlers was a haphazard and primitive process. Land clearing was accomplished by chopping away the underbrush and small trees with axe, mattock, brush-hook and grub-hoe.
     Early farm work was done by oxen and horses. They pulled crude wooden plows, all sowing was done by hand, cultivating by hoe, hay and grain cutting with sickle, and threshing with flail.
     Corn was planted by dropping the kernels, a hill at a time, into regularly spaced holes made with a hoe. Grain was broadcast by hand, some using the one-hand, but the more expert the two-hand method.
     We’ll take a look back at the evolution of farming in the county.


Random Sheboygan County History
Tuesday, November 28, 2017
​1:00pm to 2:30pm
Oostburg Public Library
213 North 8th Street, Oostburg, Wisconsin

     Fun stuff for the inquiring mind - It's odd and interesting history. What is the real story of the Dead Horse? Who was the Black Terror of Sheboygan? Have you ever read an obituary for an outhouse? Learn the meaning of the term, Yeggman. Find out why Cupid was baffled. And read the full story behind the murder of revered, early teacher, John Sexton. Great reading for quiet time, you’ll enjoy every story and photo included in this random collection of historical gems.


On the Home Front  -  World War II
Wednesday, December 6, 2017
1:00pm to 2:30pm

Generations

1500 Douglas Drive

Plymouth, Wisconsin


     The Home Front is a chronological account of daily life for Sheboygan County residents and how it changed dramatically during World War II.
     The story is told by way of the actual headlines, story excerpts, photographs, editorials, and advertisements as published in Sheboygan County newspapers at that time --- the Sheboygan Press, Plymouth Review, Sheboygan County News and Random Lake Times.
     All of the items selected and included in The Home Front came from the listed newspapers that were published between December 8, 1941 and August 23, 1945.
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HISTORY ON THE MOVE

Maine Researcher Located Great-Grandfather

Annette, a researcher from Maine, found many references to her family in 19th century documents at the Center. One of these included her great-grandfather’s obituary from 1899, which stated that he was buried, not in a cemetery, but on his own farm. Using old plat maps, Annette located the property just south of Sheboygan Falls. She made an impromptu visit to the property on her way to the airport. Fortunately, the owners were home and they actually knew of the burial. They took her to the gravesite, hidden for more than 100 years, behind the barn he had worked so hard to build.  


Annette
Maine
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 (920) 467-4667